I'm B. I'm 25. I live in Mississippi & watch a lot of movies. I talk about Sherlock as a consulting fan for The Three Patch Podcast.

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Likes: Sherlock, LOTR, Space, Tom Hiddleston & Game of Thrones Dislikes: Spiders, Humidity, Haters & Winona Ryder.
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Journey - Scenery Part 1
59 minutes ago on August 28th | J | 1,023 notes

stuckonprospit:

persnicketyqueerprincess:

Beautiful collection of straight boys interacting with a bisexual for hopefully the first time in their lives.

BUT YOU MIGHT SEE MY BISEXUAL GILLS

2 hours ago on August 28th | J | 130,779 notes
antlerella:

I can’t draw anything except Bubbline lately which isn’t a bad thing because they’re so cute 

antlerella:

I can’t draw anything except Bubbline lately which isn’t a bad thing because they’re so cute 

3 hours ago on August 28th | J | 12,220 notes
asharastarfall:

inspired by this post

asharastarfall:

inspired by this post

4 hours ago on August 28th | J | 412 notes
mythandrists:

Women of the Classical World | Dread Persephone

The rape of Persephone is one of the earliest recorded Greek myths, and the most often misappropriated. Persephone’s capture by Hades is an allegory for the Greek institution of marriage, but what’s often overlooked is how closely this myth correlates to the real-life horrors of marriage and womanhood in ancient Greece.
Before Persephone’s capture, she lives with her mother, Demeter, and is known by the name Κόρη, which literally translates to “girl” or “virgin.” When the god Hades - her much older uncle - sees her, he falls instantly in love, and asks Zeus, Persephone’s father-uncle and Hades’ brother, for her hand in marriage. When Hades carries her away on his chariot, she is still a young teenager, probably between thirteen and fifteen years of age - the Greeks’ idea of a healthy marriageable age for girls.

ἁρπάξας δ’ ἀέκουσαν ἐπὶ χρυσέοισιν ὄχοισινἧγ’ ὀλοφυρομένην· ἰάχησε δ’ ἄρ’ ὄρθια φωνῇ,κεκλομένη πατέρα Κρονίδην ὕπατον καὶ ἄριστον.
And he seized the unwilling girl up on his golden chariotas she wailed, and she cried out in her clear voice,pleading with her father, Zeus the best and highest. (Hom. Hymn 2 to Demeter)

So Persephone goes down to Hades as an unwilling bride. This parallels a traditional Greek marriage ceremony, in which the bride was led through the streets by her new husband, who gripped her by the wrist as she looked at the ground and followed him, submissively, to his house.
Persephone’s myth has a supposedly happy ending: It’s said that she grew to consider the Underworld home, and that she rivaled the other gods in power. Hades was faithful to his wife, unlike most Greek gods, and because she was a goddess, Persephone was granted the concession that she would be able to visit her mother for a few months every year - a concession that mortal women might not have been given. In short, the myth of Persephone and Hades tells us two things: First, the Greeks believed that a woman who was forced would come to love her husband; and second, that the Greeks believed that a woman could only become powerful by accepting the wishes of her father and husband and learning to make the best of her new home after marriage.
You can read Homeric Hymn 2, in which Persephone’s story is told, here. The story is also told in Apollodorus’ Library 1.29, Ovid’s Metamorphoses Book 5, and referenced in Cicero’s In Verrem 2.4, among others. Photo credit to Luminous Lu.

mythandrists:

Women of the Classical World | Dread Persephone

The rape of Persephone is one of the earliest recorded Greek myths, and the most often misappropriated. Persephone’s capture by Hades is an allegory for the Greek institution of marriage, but what’s often overlooked is how closely this myth correlates to the real-life horrors of marriage and womanhood in ancient Greece.

Before Persephone’s capture, she lives with her mother, Demeter, and is known by the name Κόρη, which literally translates to “girl” or “virgin.” When the god Hades - her much older uncle - sees her, he falls instantly in love, and asks Zeus, Persephone’s father-uncle and Hades’ brother, for her hand in marriage. When Hades carries her away on his chariot, she is still a young teenager, probably between thirteen and fifteen years of age - the Greeks’ idea of a healthy marriageable age for girls.

ἁρπάξας δ’ ἀέκουσαν ἐπὶ χρυσέοισιν ὄχοισιν
ἧγ’ ὀλοφυρομένην· ἰάχησε δ’ ἄρ’ ὄρθια φωνῇ,
κεκλομένη πατέρα Κρονίδην ὕπατον καὶ ἄριστον.

And he seized the unwilling girl up on his golden chariot
as she wailed, and she cried out in her clear voice,
pleading with her father, Zeus the best and highest. (Hom. Hymn 2 to Demeter)

So Persephone goes down to Hades as an unwilling bride. This parallels a traditional Greek marriage ceremony, in which the bride was led through the streets by her new husband, who gripped her by the wrist as she looked at the ground and followed him, submissively, to his house.

Persephone’s myth has a supposedly happy ending: It’s said that she grew to consider the Underworld home, and that she rivaled the other gods in power. Hades was faithful to his wife, unlike most Greek gods, and because she was a goddess, Persephone was granted the concession that she would be able to visit her mother for a few months every year - a concession that mortal women might not have been given. In short, the myth of Persephone and Hades tells us two things: First, the Greeks believed that a woman who was forced would come to love her husband; and second, that the Greeks believed that a woman could only become powerful by accepting the wishes of her father and husband and learning to make the best of her new home after marriage.

You can read Homeric Hymn 2, in which Persephone’s story is told, here. The story is also told in Apollodorus’ Library 1.29, Ovid’s Metamorphoses Book 5, and referenced in Cicero’s In Verrem 2.4, among others. Photo credit to Luminous Lu.

5 hours ago on August 28th | J | 1,172 notes
bikiniarmorbattledamage:

babesinarmor:

"1880’s Austrian women’s fencing team poses in the fencing style of sword and dagger."
From the website of Christopher L. Oberg:

"In the early 1900’s Fencing was chosen as an olympic sport featuring the three weapons we know today. Historical fencing styles featuring back sword, rapier and dagger ect. are no longer fashionable when compared to the modern olympic fencing games of foil, epee and saber.”


Occasionally we see people advocating boobplates under the reasoning that some fencing gear comes boobplates.  And it’s true, there are are breast guards made for fencing that are essentially a plastic boobplate.

However, you won’t see many women wearing them as their front line of defense at say… the Olympics.   You also won’t see them outside of the sport of fencing, because they’re really on effective against modern sport swords which have flexible blades and virtually no weight (less than 500 grams or 17.64 ounces)
In the 1800s, when dueling became a sport instead of a means of settling arguments, fencing weapons have been light and relatively non-lethal that duelists used to take pride in facial scars they acquired (and their ability to walk calmly away from them).
Of course, modern fencing expects you to wear the proper protection against modern fencing weapons:

This is gear intended for sporting events, not for life and death battles.
- wincenworks

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

babesinarmor:

"1880’s Austrian women’s fencing team poses in the fencing style of sword and dagger."

From the website of Christopher L. Oberg:

"In the early 1900’s Fencing was chosen as an olympic sport featuring the three weapons we know today. Historical fencing styles featuring back sword, rapier and dagger ect. are no longer fashionable when compared to the modern olympic fencing games of foil, epee and saber.

Occasionally we see people advocating boobplates under the reasoning that some fencing gear comes boobplates.  And it’s true, there are are breast guards made for fencing that are essentially a plastic boobplate.

image

However, you won’t see many women wearing them as their front line of defense at say… the Olympics.   You also won’t see them outside of the sport of fencing, because they’re really on effective against modern sport swords which have flexible blades and virtually no weight (less than 500 grams or 17.64 ounces)

In the 1800s, when dueling became a sport instead of a means of settling arguments, fencing weapons have been light and relatively non-lethal that duelists used to take pride in facial scars they acquired (and their ability to walk calmly away from them).

Of course, modern fencing expects you to wear the proper protection against modern fencing weapons:

image

This is gear intended for sporting events, not for life and death battles.

- wincenworks

6 hours ago on August 28th | J | 1,424 notes

sushinfood:

tastefullyoffensive:

20 Mind-Boggling Shower Thoughts [showerthoughts/distractify]

Previously: Name Improvements for Everyday Stuff

The Crisp one was amazing to me until my Aussie friend spoke up and said AND IT GOES THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION IF YOU SAY PISS RACK.

7 hours ago on August 28th | J | 122,066 notes

modestdemidov:

swaggiegreaser:

samirows:

smilingeridan:

ah yes, i call this masterpiece “waist up character faces left with neutral expression”

image

OH MY GOD

this makes me feel better

8 hours ago on August 28th | J | 56,623 notes

sheepwright:

 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

11 hours ago on August 27th | J | 23 notes

ghoulnextdoor:

Intricate, intimate eye embroidery by Mrs Gibson’s Atelier 

12 hours ago on August 27th | J | 9,016 notes